Alice Ronchi

concrete

In Alice Ronchi’s sculpture and installations, everyday life – the life we understand through reason and logic - meets the world of invention and fantasy. Ronchi views the everyday objects around us with the eyes of a fascinated child. While we try to explain the world in rational terms, her videos and installations show us that fantasy is just as much a part of that world.

Ronchi creates colourful, harmonious compositions of a wide array of elements – sometimes existing artefacts, sometimes roughly shaped materials. By applying common utensils in unconventional ways she shapes fantasy full landscapes that become a metaphor for the way elements interconnect and interact with each other and how these interrelating systems enclose the viewer in their inherent logic. Her fascination and her curiosity are infectious, stimulating viewers to open their eyes. For example three umbrellas turned inside out by the wind in her imagination become three enormous mushrooms. In one of her video sketches, a person leans forward and blows softly onto a brightly coloured feather duster turning it instantly into a vibrant creature. In our fantasy, at least.

The apparent opposition of the rational and the imagined also features in the work that Ronchi created for the lobby of the new Nationale Postcode Loterij office in Amsterdam’s Zuidas. Set in an urban architectural environment, grass and earth are nourished by mineral substances drawn from the surrounding stones. Together, they form a perfect seedbed for a unique type of flower: the so-called pebble plant. Flora is the result of an ongoing photographic series of the same title in which Ronchi shows the beauty and elegance of urban structures. In 2014, she began photographing objects and architecture in the urban environment that resemble flowers and plants. Her work for GET LOST may be viewed as an abstract and magnified version of this series. Constructed with recurring identical concrete casts, the structure has a typical Ronchi association. The flowering stones become an exotic, imaginative addition, a symbol of the fertility of this urban landscape.

Alice Ronchi (b. 1989) lives and works in Amsterdam and Milan. She graduated at Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti (NABA), Milan and gained an MA in Material Utopias at Sandberg Instituut.